ARTIST

EWOUD DE GROOT

About the Artist

Ewoud de Groot was born in Alkmaar, the Netherlands and lives and works in Egmond aan Zee, a coastal village in the Northern Netherlands.


After receiving a degree in illustration and painting from the Minerva Academy of Art in Groningen, he began illustrating nature books for a period before pursuing painting full-time in 1999.


Today, de Groot is recognized as a rising star in wildlife painting, bringing a truly unique perspective to the genre. He paints his subjects in a traditional way, whilst the landscape is more abstract and suggestive, always exploring all the different facets of composition, colour and technique.  His method is to build layers using cold bluish greys and warm brownish grey, starting with big brush strokes before using a palette knife to develop composition.


His work strives to find both a balance and tension between the representational and the abstract, the traditional and the contemporary. For de Groot, painting wildlife is not an exercise in rendering all the painstaking details. Instead, his work is an ongoing experiment of composition, color, and technique, concerned with conveying a sense of mood and atmosphere found in the natural world.


He is a member of the Pulchri Studio in the Hague, the most prestigious art society in Holland, the Dutch Society of Marine Artists, Society of Animal Artists and the Artists Society of Bergen.


In 2014 he became the featured painter at Western Visions the annual show and sale of the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Wyoming, USA.  He is been represented by many gallery’s throughout the US, UK and the Netherlands.

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"To me, as an artist, producing a good painting is about exploring all the different facets of composition, colour and technique and not just reproducing an image in a photorealistic way. Although I consider myself a figurative painter, I always try to find that essential balance and tension between the more abstract background and the realism of the subject(s). In a way you could say that I am on the frontier between figurative and non-figurative, or the traditional and the modern."