top of page

ARTIST

PAUL BENNETT

About the Artist

After years of creating at a desk and in front of a computer he wanted to return to a studio and found the perfect one, tacked to the side of an old steam museum in Kew Bridge. It was a great place to rediscover his love of painting – a more tactile way of creating. After a few successful exhibitions and involvement with some great galleries, Paul became a professional Fine Artist. It took a few years creating before he started to experiment and capture a sense of place for his abstract seascapes and landscapes paintings. 


After a decade or so, Paul was lucky enough to be able to relocate from London and now lives in the Lake District National Park. On some weekends he shares his studio with his nine-year-old daughter and five-year-old son, who one day might follow in the footsteps of their dad and become artists. His original seascape and landscape paintings are inspired by memory and experience and are developed using artistic intuition. They are not tied into any specific region or time, they are an eclectic synthesis of place, weather and season. 


Oil paint is the medium that plays a big part in capturing the essence of a faded memory and lends itself nicely to the way he paints. It works well when applied thickly or can create great depth when worked into the surface sparingly, leaving previous layers partially exposed. The paint is applied in this way to give the artwork itself a narrative and history, where the process of its creation can be glimpsed at in places – not dissimilar to the way in which the memory deals with the hazy recollection of a place once visited.


Paul Bennett's original artworks can be found in the gallery Gladwells Rutland in Oakham and are for sale from both the art gallery and online.

press to zoom
press to zoom
press to zoom
1/1

‘I spend my days in the studio, creating semi abstract seascapes and landscapes. When I get the chance, I venture into the lakes, mountains, and coastlines of England. Scotland is also a great inspiration and luckily, is not too far from me now.’ - Paul Bennett

bottom of page