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Brought up in Paris and Pontoise by parents who owned a butchers shop, Loiseau served an apprenticeship with a decorator who was a friend of the family. In 1887, when a legacy from his grandmother allowed him to concentrate on painting, he enrolled at the École des arts décoratifs where he studied life-drawing. However, a year later he left the school after an argument with his teacher.

Loiseau’s paintings, revealing his passion for the seasons from the beginning of spring to the harvests later in the autumn, often depict the same orchard or garden scene as time goes by. Series of this kind, which also include cliffs, harbours or churches, are reminiscent of Claude Monet. Although Loiseau did not complete many portraits, he often painted people at work: dockers together with their boats, villagers leaving a Sunday service in Brittany or arriving at the market in Pont-Aven, or even carriages in Paris driving across the Place de la Bastille and the Étoile. He is also remembered for his paintings of Paris streets such as the Rue de Clignancourt or the Avenue de Fiedland. From the 1920s, he painted many still-lifes. His overall approach, rather than being associated with any particular theory, is simply an attempt to represent scenes as sincerely as possible.

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